“That’s one unique point in the hologram.” – Kakkab Nammax

Sadalsuud, when translated, means the ‘luckiest of the lucky’ or the ‘luck of lucks’. In the context of older worldviews such as Egyptian, Persian and Islamic mythology, Sadalsuud relates to the rising of the Sun when winter has passed (March) and the season of gentle, continuous rain has begun. Hence the myth of ‘luck’ or ‘good fortune’ was seen as closely aligned with the essence of spring itself, the burgeoning of new life, and by extension agriculture, which in all societies is the very foundation of prosperity or ‘good fortune’. This mythological view of ‘the luck of the lucks’ also belongs to the 22d Manzil (Arabic Lunar Mansion), which included the two stars Bunda (ξ Aqr) and c Cap.

β and ξ Aquarii also constitute the Persian lunar mansion Bunda and the similar Coptic mansion Upuineuti, the meaning of which is ‘The Foundation’.

In Chinese mythology, β Aqr alone marks the sieu (Chinese Lunar Mansion) Heu, Hiu, or Hü, ‘the Void’, anciently Ko, the central one of the seven sieu which, taken together, were known as Heung Wu, the Black Warrior, in the northern quarter of the sky. As such, Sadalsuud is an expression of the feminine archetype, the Yin or ‘Void’ (Cosmic Mother), from which, many cultures have believed, creation itself (birth) emanates.

In Chinese, 虚宿 (Xū Sù), meaning ’emptiness’ (asterism), refers to an asterism consisting of β Aquarii and α Equulei. Consequently, β Aquarii itself is known as 虛宿 (Xū Sù yī, English: the First Star of Emptiness.)

Sadalsuud is found in Hindu texts as Kalpeny and in the context of the ancient Indian system of astronomy, Jyotisha Veda, is located in the 23rd Nakshatra Shravishthā, a lunar mansion which is ruled by Eight vasus – the ‘deities of earthly abundance’. On the Euphrates, Sadalsuud was known as Kakkab Nammax, the Star of Mighty Destiny; that may have given origin to the title of the manzil, as well as to the astrologers’ name for it, Fortuna Fortunarum. (Source: Wikipedia).