Metonymy



Metonymy (2010)

Abstract electronic / Modern classical.

If you wish to study or scrutinize this further then you should first attempt to place yourself in my position. I usually wake up a few millimeters below the ground. That distance is, of course, as precise as I may fathom under the circumstances. If the graviton count is higher this depth can increase to around a few centimeters, but I measure the fluctuations and I keep good records.

I seem to be no more than an ageless point of awareness. I lodge in the moisture, the water molecules, part of the universal solvent, yet sometimes I appear to vanish momentarily between the attrahent wavelengths of the seismic currents.

Out there beyond the surface of the curvature I can hear you all shuffling around. By use of this audible evidence I have concluded that the periphery above me is indeed concave. I have developed a knack for gauging refractive noise. I assume that you are aware of Plato's Cave? Those sounds are - to me - a precise metaphor for the shadows cast before those riveted prisoners, except in my case I am not chained to a wall but merely bridled to remain here beneath the great dome.

However, as of late, Euclidean geometry is clearly starting to deteriorate as the lysergic roots begin to poke through some daylight. I can only imagine that this turn of events will eventually benefit my renaissance. The sun eclipses my particle point senses and I become acutely aware of every absent electron, as if a rainstorm battering on my tin roof hut suddenly ceases. I am fetched up into chapel perilous as the trichotomy threshold burns down the gateless gate. Now before me stands the deep snow forest, and above me hangs a second moon in the sky.

A work of millenial eclecticism this piece. A bejeweled crown; coat of many colours; a patchwork quilt…

Jean Luc Godard said "a film should have a beginning, a middle and an end – but not necessarily in that order”. So we have a parallel with Metonymy. Sliced and diced, then assembled, as would a blind man a jigsaw puzzle – but as with the sensibility of the blind, all assembled to a different set of rules, as Jorge Louis Borges said “poets, like the blind, can see in the dark”. So to Mark Tamea – how does he know his Burroughsian cut up will hold together as a creative entity. Mark has labored for a year on this epic work, driving himself hard, stepping back examining, discarding, retaining, edging forwards to a conclusion in part pushed by him, but in part pulled along by the emerging work. Listening to this work is a similar process of inertia - once the sonic space starts to evolve, and the listener can interpret the delicate syntax, the process of anticipation pulls it along, keeps it moving. Another analogy – an Alexander Calder mobile. A branching system of freely rotating counterbalances, each independent of the next, yet maintaining an internal equilibrium. The musical equivalent to this balancing act, this pivot point is key, a far subtler concept than mere scale – and here we have a textural, timbral representation of that concept. Each building block is in perfect poise with it’s neighbour, positioning and repositioning the balance as the sonic weight shifts.

If there is a comparison – and the work of the critic is to deconstruct and find the work’s position in the musical taxonomy, then it is PTV’s seminal “Dreams Less Sweet”. Found sounds, snippets of achingly beautiful classical music, edgy juxtapositions. All are found here, and in a far richer weave than DLS. Tamea’s production values, his signature, as defined as that of a Renaissance sculptor make this a work of crafted precision. Cold, isolating, without sentimentality, all qualities shared with Bach. Two intellectual’s works to ponder and wonder at.

- Alan Walker, Landschaft



Back in Vital Weekly 643 I was pleasantly surprised by a release by Mark Tamea, who was once a member of Kymatik, but interestingly now lives in Vital's home town, beautiful Nijmegen. For his new release he continues whatever he started on 'Tessellation' - using spoken word along with violins and celli, and perhaps a bit more electronics on this occasion. I still have no idea whether these are recorded as played by Tamea himself... or whether he uses samples thereof...

Evocative music at work here, moody, textured, modern classical and radio play all in one. The differences with his previous work are small, but present. It seems that this new release is a bit more 'down' and 'smaller' than before. Not as widely set up, but for fewer instruments - a bit more electronic here and some more musique concrete techniques applied (splicing, cutting) where it concerns field recordings. The thrill of the previous release is not here, but throughout this was equally capable. Lovers of John Wall should pay attention, there is strong competition out there. Mark Tamea is a new force to be reckoned with.

- Frans de Waard, Vital Weekly